family leave wikipedia chart

THISZ MATTERIALL ISZ FROM

WHERE IN ANY WORLD SZHOULD BABYESZ, CHILDREN, MOTHERSZ, FATHERSZ & FAMILYESZ BE WITHOUT THE OPTIMALL DEVELLEOPMENTALL EXPERIENCESZ . WHAT ISZ MORE ESSZENTIALL TO DEFINING OUR HUMANITY THAN THE WAY WE LOVE & RAISZE CHILDREN?????

OR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parental_leave#Variation_in_international_law

The link comesz up within the firszt page of a szearch for family leave on moszt szearch enginesz.  How can it be that thisz isszue hasz been avoided by our media & even morszt womensz organizationsz for over 25 yearsz, our media & organiszationsz are either $everely lacking in knowing what isz important in life, or were activelly coopted by patriarchal corporate infiltration, covert coercion & cen$or$hip. But much harder to explain isz the lack of many people citing thisz data on szo many globsz, the lack of family leave in the U$  isz an indictment of the U$ culture & a crime again$t humanity, particularly babyesz & mothersz, but all people, who all sztart out asz babyesz who all deszerve the beszt not the worszt anywhere in the worldsz.

Variation in international law

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women introduces “maternity leave with pay or with comparable social benefits without loss of former employment, seniority or social allowances”.[41] The Maternity Protection Convention C 183 adopted in 2000 by International Labour Organization requires 14 weeks of maternity leave as minimum condition.[42]

National laws vary widely according to the politics of each jurisdiction. As of 2012, only three countries do not mandate paid time off for new parents: Papua New Guinea, Lesotho, and the United States.[43][44]

Unless otherwise specified, the information in the tables below is gathered from the most recent International Labour Organization reports. Maternity leave refers to the legal protection given to the mother immediately after she gives birth (but may also include a period before the birth), paternity leave to legal protection given to the father immediately after the mother gives birth, and parental leave to protected time for childcare (usually for either parent) either after the maternity/paternity leave or directly immediately after birth (for example when the parent is not eligible for maternity/paternity leave, and/or where the time is calculated until the child is a specific age – therefore excluding maternity/paternity leave – usually such jurisdictions protect the job until the child reaches a specific age. [45]) Others allow the parental leave to be transferred into part-time work time. Parental leave is generally available to either parent, except where specified. Leave marked “Unpaid” indicates the job is protected for the duration of the leave. Different countries have different rules regarding eligibility for leave, and long a parent has to have worked at their place of employment prior to giving birth before they are eligible for paid leave. In the European Union, the policies vary significantly by country – with regard to length, to payment, and to how parental leave relates to prior maternity leave – but the EU members must abide by the minimum standards of the Pregnant Workers Directive and Parental Leave Directive.[46]

Africa

Country Maternity leave (weeks) Maternity leave(% of pay) Paternity leave (weeks) Paternity leave (% of pay) Parental leave [For EITHER parent] (weeks) Parental leave (% of pay) Source of payment
Algeria 14[47] 100% <1[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Angola 13[47] 100% 0[48] N/A 0[48] N/A Social security
Benin 14[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social insurance; 50% employer. Paternity: 100% employer)
Botswana 12[47] 50% 0[48] N/A 0[48] N/A Employer liability
Burkina Faso 14[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 52[48] Unpaid Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Burundi 12[47] 100% 2+[48] 50% 0[48] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social insurance; 50% employer. Paternity: 100% employer)
Cameroon 14[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Cape Verde 09[47] 90% 0[48] N/A 0[48] N/A Social security
Central Africa Republic 14[47] 50% 2[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Chad 14[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 52[48] Unpaid Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Comoros 14[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Employer liability
Congo 15[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social insurance; 50% employer. Paternity: 100% employer)
Côte d’Ivoire 14[47] 100% 2[48] 100% 0[48] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Democratic Republic of the Congo 14[47] 67% <1[49] 100% 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Djibouti 14[47] 100% <1[49] 100% 0[49] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social insurance; 50% employer. Paternity: 100% employer)
Egypt 13[47] 100% 0[49] N/A 104 (only mothers)[49] Unpaid Mixed (75% social security; 25% employer liability)
Equatorial Guinea 12[47] 75% 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Social security
Eritrea 09[47] Unk 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Ethiopia 13[47] 100% 1[49] Unpaid 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Gabon 14[47] 100% 2[49] 100% 0[49] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Gambia 12[47] 100% 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Ghana 12[47] 100% 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Guinea 14[47] 100% 0[49] N/A 38 (only mothers)[49] Unpaid Mixed (50% social insurance; 50% employer)
Guinea-Bissau 09[47] 100% 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Mixed (social security flat rate, employer pays the difference to equal wage)
Kenya 13[50] 100% 2[49] 100% 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Lesotho 12[50] 100% 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Libya 14[50] 50% (100% for self-employed women) <1[49] 0[49] N/A Employer (social security for self-employed)
Madagascar 14[50] 100% 2[49] 100% 0[49] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social insurance; 50% employer. Paternity: 100% employer)
Malawi 08[50] 100% 0[49] N/A 0[49] N/A Employer liability
Mali 14[50] 100% <1[49] 100% 0[49] N/A Social security
Mauritania 14[50] 100% 2[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Mauritius 12[50] 100% 1[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Employer liability
Morocco 14[50] 100% <1[51] 100% 52 (only mothers)[51] Unpaid Social security
Mozambique 09[50] 100% <1[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Namibia 12[50] 100% (up to a ceiling) 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Social security
Niger 14[50] 100% 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Mixed (50% social insurance; 50% employer)
Nigeria 12[50] 50% 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Employer liability
Rwanda 12[50] 100% for 6 weeks; 20% remainder <1[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Employer liability
Sao Tome and Principe 09[50] 100% 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Social security
Senegal 14[50] 100% 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Social security
Seychelles 14[50] Flat rate for 12 weeks; unpaid remainder <1[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Sierra Leone 12[50] 100% Employer liability
Somalia 14[50] 50% 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Employer liability
South Africa 17[50] 60% <1[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Sudan 08[50] 100% 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Employer liability
Swaziland 12[50] 100% for 2 weeks; unpaid remainder 0[51] N/A 0[51] N/A Employer liability
Tanzania 12[50] 100% <1[51] 100% 0[51] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Togo 14[50] 100% 2[52] 100% 0[52] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social insurance; 50% employer. Paternity: 100% employer)
Tunisia 04[50] 66.70% <1[52] 100% 0[52] N/A Social security
Uganda 10[53] 100% <1[52] 100% 0[52] N/A Employer liability
Zambia 12[53] 100% 0[52] N/A 0[52] N/A Employer liability
Zimbabwe 14[53] 100% 0[52] N/A 0[52] N/A Employer liability

Americas

Country Maternity leave (weeks) Maternity leave (% of pay) Paternity leave (weeks) Paternity leave (% of pay) Parental leave [For EITHER parent] (weeks) Parental leave (% of pay) Source of payment
Antigua and Barbuda 13[54] 100% for 6 weeks; 60% for 7 weeks 0[55] N/A 0[55] N/A Mixed (60% social security all 13 weeks plus 40% from employer for first 6 weeks)
Argentina 13[54] 100% <1[55] 100% 0[55] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Bahamas 13[54] 100% for 12 weeks; 66.7% for 1 week <1[55] Unpaid 0[55] N/A Mixed (2/3 social security for 13 weeks; 1/3 employer for 12 weeks)
Barbados 12[56] 100% 0[55] N/A 0[55] N/A Social security
Belize 14[56] 100% 0[55] N/A 0[55] N/A Social security
Bolivia 13[56] 95% 0[55] N/A 0[55] N/A Social security
Brazil 17[56] 100% <1[55] 100% 0[55] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
British Virgin Islands 13[56] 67% Social security
Canada 15[57] 55% / Up to 80% for low-income families (Up to maximum of $524 per week)[57] 0 N/A 35[57] 55% / Up to 80% for low-income families (Up to maximum of $524 per week)[57] Social security
Chile 24[58] 100% (up to a ceiling) 1[55] 100% 12 (6 only for mothers)[55] 100% (up to a ceiling) Social security
Colombia 14[56] 100% 1+[55] 100% 0[55] N/A Social security
Costa Rica 17[56] 100% 0[55] N/A 0[55] N/A Mixed (50% social security, 50% employer)
Cuba 18[56] 100% 0[55] N/A 39[55] 60% Social security
Dominica 12[56] 60% 0[55] N/A 0[55] N/A Social security
Dominican Republic 12[56] 100% <1[55] 100% 0[55] N/A Mixed (maternity: 50% social security, 50% employer; paternity: employer liability)
Ecuador 12[56] 100% 2[55] 100% 0[55] N/A Mixed (maternity: 75% social security, 25% employer; paternity: employer liability)
El Salvador 12[56] 75% <1[55] 100% 0[55] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Grenada 13[56] 100% for 8 weeks; 65% for remainder 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Mixed (65% social security all 13 weeks plus 35% from employer for first 8 weeks)
Guatemala 12[56] 100% <1[59] 100% 0[59] N/A Mixed (maternity: 2/3 social security, 1/3 employer; paternity: employer)
Guyana 13[56] 70% 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Social security
Haiti 12[56] 100% for 6 weeks; unpaid remainder 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Employer liability
Honduras 12[56] 100% for 10 weeks; unpaid remainder 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Mixed (2/3 social security, 1/3 employer)
Jamaica 12[56] 100% for 8 weeks; unpaid remainder 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Employer liability
Mexico 12[56] 100% 1[59] 100% 0[59] N/A Social security
Nicaragua 12[56] 100% 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Mixed (60% social security, 40% employer)
Panama 14[56] 100% 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Social security
Paraguay 12[56] 50% for 9 weeks; unpaid remainder <1[59] 100% 0[59] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Peru 13[56] 100% <1[59] 100% 0[59] N/A Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Puerto Rico 8[56] 100% <1[59] 100% 0[59] N/A Employer liability
Saint Kitts and Nevis 13[60] 65% 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Social security
Saint Lucia 13[60] 65% 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Social security
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 13[60] 65% Social security
Trindad and Tobago 13[60] 100% 0[59] N/A 0[59] N/A Mixed (2/3 social security, 1/3 employer)
Uruguay 12[60] 100% <1[59] 100% Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
United States of America 0[61] N/A 0[62] N/A 12 each[62] Unpaid N/A
Venezuela 26[60] 100% 2[59] 100% 0[59] N/A Social security

Asia / Pacific

Australia has introduced an 18-week paid parental leave scheme which is publicly funded and provides the National Minimum Wage rather than a percentage of the primary caregiver’s salary. It is not be available to families where the primary caregiver has an annual salary above $150,000 per annum.[63]

Country Paid maternity leave Paid paternity leave Unpaid maternity leave Unpaid paternity leave Restrictions
Afghanistan 90 days 100%
Azerbaijan 126 days 100%
Australia 18 weeks at National Minimum Wage (currently AUD$672.70 per week as at Sept 2015[64]) subject to primary caregiver income 2 weeks at National Minimum Wage Up to 52 weeks unpaid shared between the parents Up to 3 weeks of unpaid leave The 52 weeks are shared between the parents and all leave needs to be taken before the baby’s first birthday. Australian maternity leave is means tested, whereby no payments are available to families where the primary caregiver has an annual salary above $150,000 per annum.
Bahrain 60 days 100%
Bangladesh 16 weeks (8 weeks before delivery and 8 weeks after delivery) 100% In case of third (+) time mother, who has two or more babies alive already.
Cambodia 90 days 50% 10 days special leave for family events
China 98 days 100%
Fiji 84 days Flat rate
Hong Kong 10 weeks 80% 3 days 80%
India 12 weeks 100%. Up to 15 days male leave. Does not apply to the state of Jammu and Kashmir.[65] Prohibits employers from allowing women to work within six weeks after giving birth.[66] A female employee is eligible only if she worked for the employer at least 80 days during the 12-month period preceding the date of expected delivery.[67] In the case of a stillbirth or miscarriage, six weeks of paid leave is required instead.[67] Female employees of the Central Government of India receive 180 days of leave.[68] In December 2015, the government announced that it would increase the duration of maternity leave for women in the private sector to 26 weeks.[69]
Indonesia 3 months 100% Two days’ paid when wife gives birth
Iran 6 months 100% 2 weeks compulsory 100%
Iraq 62 days 100%
Israel 14 weeks 100%. The weeks from 6th to 14th can be taken by the father. Can take the paid leave instead of the mother starting from the 6th week (up to 14 weeks) 1 year
Japan 14 weeks 60% 1 year 1 year When parents take turns, the total period may be extended 2 months (but no longer than 1 year for each parent).[70]
Jordan 10 weeks 100%
Korea, Republic of 90 days 100% 1 year (40% of Original Salary, At least $400 At most $1,000 per a month paid by Employment Insurance) until the child is 6 years old Parents who have a child under 6 years old can get 1 year parental leave. The only condition that the employee(s) must satisfy is to have worked for at least 1 year in the company at the time the child is born.
Kuwait 70 days 100%
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 3 months 70%
Lebanon 10[71] weeks 100% 1 day 100%
Malaysia 60 days 100%
Mongolia 120 days 70%
Myanmar 12 weeks 66.7% Six days of “casual leave” that can be used by fathers to assist their spouses at the time of confinement
Nepal 52 days 100%
New Zealand 18 weeks, 100% or NZ$516.85 per week[72] (whichever is lower). May start up to 6 weeks prior to birth; can be shared with father. None, plus any share from mother 52 weeks (including paid leave). Can be shared with father. 2 weeks, plus any share from mother If the mother is ordered to start leave early by a doctor, midwife or their employer, maternity leave may be extended beyond 18 weeks to the difference between the date of the order and the expected delivery date, plus 10 weeks.
Oman 14 weeks, 100%; 50 days prior to and 50 days after birth (per Omani Labor Law, Royal Decree No. 35/2003, 26 April 2003).[73]
Pakistan 45 days prior to confinement and 45 days after the confinement under rule 13 of the Revised Leave Rules, 1980. But it is 60 days for Armed Forces Nursing Service (AFNS)100%
Papua New Guinea 0 days 12 weeks
Philippines 60 days 100%, applicable also to miscarriages. 78 days 100% for C-section delivery. 7 days 100% parental leave per year for solo parents until the child is 18, or indefinitely if the child has a disability. Seven days paid paternity leave for married workers. 7 days 100% parental leave per year for solo parents until the child is 18, or indefinitely if the child has a disability. Maternity and paternity leave benefits are up to the 4th pregnancy only.
Qatar 50 days 100% for civil servants
Saudi Arabia 10 weeks 50% or 100% One day
Singapore 16 weeks 100% (Singaporean citizen) or 12 weeks 67% (non-Singaporean citizen)[74] 1 week of 100% Government-Paid Paternity Leave for fathers. 1 week of 100% Government-Paid Shared Parental Leave to allow fathers to share 1 week of the working mother’s maternity leave entitlement.[75] 16 weeks of Maternity Leave is restricted to married women whose children are Singapore citizens (at least one parent is a Singapore citizen) and has served her employer for at least 90 days before the child’s birth.[74]
Solomon Islands 12 weeks 25%
Sri Lanka 12 weeks 100% (84 working days), 84 days 50% 03 days 100% 84 days
Syrian Arab Republic 50 days 70%
Taiwan 8 weeks 100% for more than six months of employment or 50% for less six months of employment 5 days 100%
Thailand 90 days 100% for 45 days paid by employer, then 45 days paid at 50% of wages (to a maximum of 7,500 baht per month) by the Thailand Social Security Fund
United Arab Emirates 45 Days 100% 55 days (total 100 days maternity leave) Maternity leave at 100% pay is subject to the employee having served continuously for not less than one year. The maternity leave shall be granted with half pay if the woman has not completed one year.
Vietnam 4–6 months 100%
Yemen 60 days 100%

Europe and Central Asia

Country Maternity leave(weeks) Maternity leave(% of pay) Paternity leave (weeks) Paternity leave(% of pay) Parental leave [For EITHER parent] (weeks) Parental leave(% of pay) Source of payment
Albania 52[54] 80% for 21 weeks; 50% remainder 0[76] N/A 2[76] 100% Mixed (Social security for maternity leave; employer liability for parental leave)
Andorra 16[77] 100% 0[78] N/A 0[78] N/A Social security
Armenia 20[54] 100% 0[76] N/A 156[76] Unpaid Social security
Austria 16[77] 100% 0[78] N/A 104[78] Flat rate Social security
Azerbaijan 18[54] 100% 2[76] Unpaid 156[76] Flat rate Social security
Belarus 18[54] 100% 0[76] N/A 156[76] 80% of minimum wage Social security
Belgium 15[77] 82% for 4 weeks; 75% for remainder (up to ceiling) 2[79] 100% for 3 days; 82% remainder 17[79] Flat rate Mixed (3 days paternity leave employer liability; Social security)
Bosnia and Herzegovina 52[54] 50%-100% 1+[76] 100% 156[76] Unpaid Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Bulgaria 32[77] 90% 2[79] 90% 26[79] 90% Social security
Croatia 58[54] 100% for 26 weeks; flat-rate remainder 2[76] 100% 156[76] Unpaid Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Cyprus 18[77] 75% 0[79] N/A 13[79] Unpaid Social security
Czech Republic 28[77] 70% 0[79] N/A 156[79] Flat rate Social security
Denmark 18[77] 100% 2[79] 100% 32[79] 100% Mixed (social security & employer)
Estonia 62[80] 100% 2[79] 100% 36[79] Unpaid Social security
Finland 18[77] 70% 11[79] 70% (up to a ceiling) plus 26[79] 70% Social security
France 16[77] 70% 2+[79] 100% (up to a ceiling) 156[79] Flat rate Social security
Georgia 18[54] 100% 50[citation needed] Social security
Germany 14[77] 100% 0[81] N/A 156[81] 67% (up to a ceiling) for 52 weeks; unpaid remainder Mixed (social security & employer liability)
Greece 17[77] 100% <1[81] 100% 17 each[81] Unpaid Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Hungary 24[77] 70% 1[81] 100% 156[81] 70% (up to a ceiling) for 104 weeks; flat rate remainder Social security
Iceland 13[77] 80% 12[81] 80% (up to a ceiling) 26 each[81] 80% (up to a ceiling) for first 13 weeks each; unpaid remainder
Ireland 42[61] 80% (up to a ceiling) for 26 weeks; unpaid remainder 0[81] N/A 18 each[82] Unpaid Social security
Italy 22[61] 80% <1[81] 100% 26 each[81] 30% Social security
Kazakhstan 18[54] 100% 1[76] Unpaid 156[76] Unpaid Social security
Kyrgyzstan 18[54] 7x minimum wage Social security
Latvia 16[61] 80% 2[81] 80% 78 each[81] 70% Social security
Liechtenstein 20[83] 80%
Lithuania 18[61] 100% 4[84] 100% (up to a ceiling) 156[84] 100% for 52 weeks or 70% for 104 weeks; unpaid remainder Social security
Luxembourg 16[61] 100% <1[84] 100% 26 each[84] Flat rate Mixed (employer liability paternity leave; social security remainder)
Macedonia 39[54] 100% Social security
Malta 18[61] 100% for 14 weeks 0[84] N/A 13 each[84] Unpaid Mixed (social security & employer liability)
Moldova 18[54] 100% 0[85] N/A 156[85] Partially Social security
Monaco 16[61] 90% (up to a ceiling) 0[84] N/A 0[84] N/A Social security
Montenegro 52[54] 100% Social security
Netherlands 16[61] 100% (up to a ceiling) <1[84] 100% 26 each (with part-time work)[84] Unpaid but eligible for tax-breaks Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Norway 35 (or 45)[61] 100% for 25 weeks or 80% for 45 weeks 0-10 (depending on the mother’s tax contribution in Norway for the preceding three years[86]) 100% or 80% 36 or 46 (10 for mothers; 10 for fathers; 26 to be divided)[87] 100% for 46 weeks or 80% for 56 weeks (up to a ceiling) Social security
Poland 26[61] 100% 2[84] 100% 156[84] 60% for 26 weeks; flat rate for 104; unpaid remainder Social security
Portugal 17 (or 21)[61] 100% for 17 weeks or 80% for 21 3[84] 100% 13 each; “sharing bonus” of 4 weeks if initial leave shared[84] 25% Social security
Romania 18[61] 85% 1 (or 2)[62] 100% 52-104[62] 75% (up to ceiling)+incentive for 52 weeks; 75% (up to different ceiling) for 104 weeks[88] Social security
Russia 20[54] 100% (up to a ceiling) 0[85] N/A 156[85] 40% (up to a ceiling) for 78 weeks; unpaid remainder Social security
Serbia 20[54] 100% 1+[85] 100% 52 (only mothers)[85] 100% for 26 weeks; 60% weeks 27-39; 30% weeks 40-52 Mixed (Social security maternity leave; employer liability paternity leave)
Slovakia 34[61] 65% 0[62] N/A 156[62] Flat rate Social security
Slovenia 15[61] 100% 12[62] 100% (up to a ceiling) for 2 weeks; flat rate remainder 37[62] 90% (up to a ceiling) Social security
Spain 16[61] 100% 2[62] 100% (up to a ceiling) 156 each[62] Unpaid Social security
Sweden 18[89] 80% (up to a ceiling) 18[89] 80% (up to a ceiling) 60[89] 80% (up to a ceiling) for 42 weeks; flat rate for remainder Social security
Switzerland 14[61] 80% (up to a ceiling) 0[62] N/A 0[62] N/A Social security
Tajikistan 20[54] 100% 0[85] N/A 156[85] Flat rate for 78 weeks; unpaid remainder Social security
Turkey 16[54] 66.70% 0[85] N/A 26 (only mothers)[85] Unpaid Social security
Turkmenistan 16[54] 100% Social security
Ukraine 18[54] 100% 0[85] N/A 156[85] Flat rate for 78 weeks; childcare allowance remainder Social security
United Kingdom 52[61] 90% for 6 weeks; 90%/flat rate for 32 weeks; unpaid remainder 2[62] 90% or flat-rate (whichever is less) 13 each[62] Unpaid Mixed (employers reimbursed)
Uzbekistan 18[54] 100% 0[85] N/A 156[85] 20% of minimum wage for 104 weeks; unpaid remainder Social security

Parental leave policies in the United Nations

As international organizations are not subject to the legislation of any country, they have their own internal legislation on parental leave.

breasztfeedingmothersz&allbabyesznaturallywhollyszpringraeharriet Paid maternity leave Paid paternity leave Unpaid maternity leave Unpaid paternity leave Restrictions
United Nations

 

16 weeks 100% (however, no fewer than 10 weeks must be after delivery, even if the pre-delivery leave was longer due to a late birth) 4 weeks 100% (or 8 weeks for staff members serving at locations where they are not allowed to live with their family) The fact that a staff member is or will be on parental leave cannot be a factor in deciding contract renewal. To ensure that this is enforced, if a contract ends while the staff member is on parental leave, the contract must be extended to cover the duration of such leave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE AB$URDITY OF THE $ITUATION OF THE EARTH REGION WE HAVE BEEN CALLING THE U$ & WHY THI$ $IN OF OMI$$ION, THE INHUMANE & REPTILLIAN OPPO$ITE OF WHAT HTE DIVINE FEMININE ASZ PRESZAGED BY THE CHARACTER  OMA DE SZALLIA WOULD WANT FOR ANY CHILDREN OF ANY EARTHSZ OF THE UNIVERSZE

 

https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/economy/news/2012/08/16/11978/fact-sheet-child-care/
NO DISZCUSSZION OF FAMILY LEAVE IN OTHER LANDSZ
OURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation.
https://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/family3.asp
In 2011, 49 percent of children ages 0–4 with employed mothers were cared for primarily by a relative—their father, grandparent, sibling, other relative, or mother—while she worked. This was not statistically different from the percentages in 2010 and 2005. Twenty-four percent spent the most amount of time in a center-based arrangement (day care, nursery school, preschool, or Head Start). Thirteen percent were cared for primarily by a nonrelative in a home-based environment, such as from a family day care provider, nanny, babysitter, or au pair.
The rate of care by fathers was between 15 and 16 percent in 1985 and 1988, increased to 20 percent in 1991, and settled between 16 and 18 percent from 1993 to 2005. By 2011, the father-care rate was 19 percent.
Among children ages 0–4 in families in poverty in 2011, 18 percent were in center-based care as their primary arrangement, while 11 percent were with other relatives (relatives other than the mother, father, or grandparent). By comparison, a greater percentage of children in families at or above the poverty threshold were in center-based care (26 percent) and a smaller percentage were cared for by other relatives (4 percent).
https://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/glance.asp
Child care
Children ages 0–4, with employed mothers, whose primary child care arrangement is with a relative 48% (2010) 49% (2011) NS
Children ages 3–6, not yet in kindergarten, who were in center-based care arrangements 55% (2007) 61% (2012) Arrow pointing up
Children of at least one foreign-born parent
https://usa.childcareaware.org/advocacy-public-policy/resources/research/statefactsheets/
Our Location
https://www.momsrising.org/issues_and_resources/childcare
No mention of family leave on thisz page at all
https://www.momsrising.org/blog/new-yorks-paid-family-leave-law-coming-jan-2018-learn-more                                                                                                                                    devillopmentally inszuffircient eight weeks to begin in NY ignoring the fact that  Europeansz get 2-3 yearsz & that hasz been szhown develleopmentally needed & naturall
https://www.momsrising.org/blog/coffee-advocacy-w-momsrising-in-wa-state
12 weeks in washington state
WOULDNT IT JUSZT BE SZIMPLER TO GET ONLY RECOGNISZE PARITY ASZ REALL GOVERNMENT & GIVE REALL CARE TO CHILDREN & FAMILYESZ
https://www.momsrising.org/page/moms/pelosi-house-democrats-momsrising-advocates-to-hold-press-conference-on-the-impact-of-the-goptaxscam-on-children-and-families
TOKENISZM & NATIONALISZTIC NEAR SZIGHTEDNESSZ THISZ WOULD BE LAUGHED AT IN EUROPE & CANADA. WHY ARE AMERICAN WOMEN ACCEPTING SZUCH BETRAYILL$
Contact: Emily Hecker
December 5, 2017 202/371-1999
emily@prsolutionsdc.com
https://www.zerotothree.org/
http://www.rally4babies.org/
No connection to parite or womensz preszence in deciszion making asz connected to welle bring for babyesz
department or person, please contact our main office.
ZERO TO THREE

BookStore@zerotothree.org
ZEROTOTHREE@facebook.com

https://www.workingmother.com/best-companies-monsanto#page-2

THISZ AB$URED CONTROLLED U$ MEDIA PUBLICATION $EDUCE$ WOMEN INTO ACCEPTING PATRIARCHILL CORPORATI$M & DEVILLIPMENTIALLY UN$OUN & IN$UFFICIENT FAMILY LEAVE, CLEARELLEY SZHOWING NO ECOFEMINISZT INSZIGHT THAT HOW WE TREAT MOTHERSZ & CHILDREN AFFECTSZ & COOCCURSZ WITH WHAT WE HAVE BEEN DOING TO NATURE ON OUR PLANET IN THE NAME OF PATRIARCHILL PROFIT$ & MON$TROU$ DI$RE$PECT OF NATURE, ALL$O KEPT $ECRET BY CONTROLLED MANIPULATED MEDIA$OF INTERLOCKED BOARDROOM$ OF DADDY WARBUCK$ ENABLING TROPHY WIVE$ & $ELECTED TOKEN$  AGAIN$T HUMAN & ALL NATURE THAT DO NOT KNOW OR CARE ABOUT THEIR OWN OR ANYONESZ CHILDREN & GRANDCHILDREN OR THEIR OWN SZOULLSZ

https://monsanto.com/news-releases/monsanto-named-to-2017-working-mother-100-best-companies-list/

https://psychologybenefits.org/2016/01/13/the-choice-no-parent-should-have-to-make-the-case-for-paid-family-leave/
“The U.S. is nearly unique in its failure to require paid family leave, as one of only two countries to not have any laws mandating paid family leave (Addati, Cassirer, & Gilchrist, 2014). The current Family and Medical Leave Act ensures that only employees of large businesses (i.e., those with more than 50 employees within a 75-mile radius) do not lose their jobs when they take time off to care for a newborn; however, employers are not required to pay workers during that time – and nearly 40% of U.S. workers receive no job-protected leave at all. Of a large survey of employers in 2008, only 1/2 offered partially paid leave for mothers, and less than 1/6 did so for fathers (Gomby & Pei, 2009). Lower income workers are even less likely to have access to paid leave (Phillips, 2004).

We can help parents, like Melissa and Rob, access family leave. Current proposed legislation, the Family and Medical Insurance Leave (FAMILY) Act (S.786, H.R.1439) would provide workers up to 12 weeks of partial income when they take time off for their newborns or an elderly or disabled family member. This leave would be funded by very small payroll contributions from both employees and employers – so small that most workers in states that have implemented similar laws have reported not even noticing a change in their paychecks (Warner, 2012)!

So why haven’t we passed paid leave yet? One argument often made to oppose paid family leave is that this will hurt business owners and the economy, but this does not appear to be the case. States and countries that have implemented similar policies have actually seen their economies grow (Deprez, 2015; Ruhm, 1998).”

NOTHING HERE EITHER,  TO INDICATE DEVELLEOPMENTALL NECESSZAITY OF 2 to 3 YEARSZ & HOW OTHER COUNTRIESZ DONT JUSZT HAVE FAMILY LEAVE, THEY HAVE MULITYEAR PAID FAMILY LEAVE, COOPTATION RULE$ OVER KINDNESSZ & WISZDOM & IGNORESZ BESZT PRACTICE EMERGING MUCH BETTER IN OTHER LANDSZ
American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org

https://www.momsrising.org/issues_and_resources/maternity
“The U.S is one of the only countries in the world that doesn’t offer paid leave to new mothers.”
Thisz coopted web$ite of women $tre$$ed to the point of accepting the deficient & huanelley unacceptabelle,  ha$ only Minor reference to other landsz with not much or  no factsz about them  mentioned even though asz we szee the extremity of the U$ lack compared to excellent multiyear leave in other landsz hasz long been availabelle on wikipedia, but of coursze cen$ored on TV & corporate patriarchilly controlled web$ite$ flooded with phony happy family come on$ of adverti$er$

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Phone: (703) 341-4100
Fax: (703) 341-4101
Media (703) 341-4130 news@usa.childcareaware.org
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https://www.statista.com/statistics/184275/preprimary-school-enrollment-for-children-aged-3-5-years-since-1970/
https://www.census.gov/prod/2013pubs/p70-135.pdf
ng
of 2011, 12.5 million (61 percent)
of the 20.4 million children under
5 years of age were in some type
of regular child care arrangement
(Table 1).
2
In the interview, respon

dents report only arrangements
used on a regular basis, at least
once a week. Preschoolers—
children under 5 years old—
receiving care were more likely
to be cared for by a relative (42
percent) than by a nonrelative
(33 percent), while 12 percent
were regularly cared for by both.
3
Another 39 percent had no regular
child care arrangement.

The keeper$ of the $tat$ accept an unellected regime on an outmoded paradigm, the co occuring re$ult of both gender$ extreme irre$pon$ibility to babyesz, children, mothersz & familyeszcommunityesz that habit$ of patriarchill preference & media maniupulated patriarchill, enabilled, tokeni$m cau$ed in the U$ culture

PUT THE HEART FIRSZT & WEIGH THE LABORSZ OF LOVE IN THE LIGHT OF BALLANCE  REPARATIVELLEYESZ

 

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milkywaycoszmicearthmoreuniverszallcofederationtreeoflovelifeinlightreall

 

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